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FAQGermanyHolidays in Germany

Good Friday (Gesetzlicher Feiertag)

Good Friday (Gesetzlicher Feiertag)

In Germany, Good Friday is a public holiday, and it is a day off for the general population, with schools and most businesses closed. Good Friday is observed between March 22 and April 25 and is known as Gesetzlicher Feiertag in German. The day commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

About Good Friday

In Germany, Good Friday falls under the category of “silent public holidays,” where authorities prohibit public entertainment that disturbs the silence and undermines the seriousness and purpose of the holiday. This includes dancing and musical performances in all kinds of pubs or other public food establishments. Restrictions on certain activities also depend on the type of silent public holiday, with the most severe restrictions in place for this day.

Easter Sale Amazon.de Germany 2024

Celebrating the German Easter Holidays is much more than just finding eggs. Federal holidays flank the German Easter Weekend in Germany, extending the holiday and making the shopping preparations a bit tricky for those who like to grab things last minute. Easter is a time of gathering with family and visits with Oma and Opa. Many communities hold Easter Egg races for children.

In English, the Friday before Easter Sunday is Good Friday. According to the Church, this was the day Jesus was put to death on the cross. In German, the roots of Karfreitag comes from the German word for “lament”. This sad holiday is spent with family.

History behind Good Friday being a public holiday in Germany

    • Good Friday is a local holiday in every German state that marks the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.
    • Germany officially recognizes it as a public holiday, and the general population observes it as a day off, with schools and most businesses closed.
    • Germany also considers this day one of the “silent public holidays,” along with All Saints’ Day, All Souls’ Day, and Christmas Eve.
    • The concept of “silent public holidays” aims to provide a qualified atmosphere of peace and quiet, compatible with the Constitution.

Significance of Good Friday in Germany

    • Good Friday is a public holiday in Germany and is known as Gesetzlicher Feiertag in German.
    • The day commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.
    • As it is one of the “silent public holidays,” it means that German authorities prohibit public entertainment that disturbs the silence and undermines the seriousness and purpose of the holiday.

Celebration of Good Friday in Germany

    • Good Friday is spent with family.
    •  Many people in Germany commemorate Jesus by abstaining from eating meat and from public entertainment.
    •  Church services are held to remember the crucifixion of Jesus.
    • Traditional foods or customs associated with Good Friday in Germany
    • There are no specific traditional foods associated with this one-day holiday in Germany.
    • However, many communities hold Easter Egg races for children.

How non-Christian Germans typically spend this day

    • Non-Christian Germans typically enjoy the day off on Good Friday.
    • They may spend time with family and friends, engage in leisure activities, or take advantage of the holiday to relax and unwind.

Special events or parades held on this occasion in Germany

    • There are no special events or parades specifically associated with Good Friday mentioned in the search results.
    • However, German authorities generally prohibit public entertainment that disturbs the silence and undermines the seriousness and purpose of the holiday on Good Friday.

Good Friday in Germany is a solemn and deeply religious observance that reflects the country’s rich Christian heritage. With its traditions of church services, processions, and reflection, it serves as a poignant reminder of the significance of this holy day and the spiritual values it represents.

Also Check:

Public Holidays in Germany

5 Prominent Festivals in Germany

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